Quantum Computing: A Primer

“Only six electronic digital computers would be required to satisfy the computing needs of the entire United States.” A prediction made by Howard Aiken in 1947 which on hindsight, we can all agree on has not turned out to be very prophetic. The need for processing power has continuously been on the rise and for the most part, the need has been catered through unparalleled evolution of chip technology as forecasted by Moore’s Law. Moore’s Law states that the number of components that can fit on a computer chip will double roughly every two years, which in turn will improve the processing capabilities of computer chips. The law which is more of an observation rather than a physical law, has held true over the decades and has seen digital computers which originally took up entire rooms reduced to being carried around in our very own pockets. But with components reaching atomic scales, and more and more money being fueled in to make chips smaller and faster, it has now come to a point where we cannot count on chip technology to advance as predicted by Moore’s Law. Hence, alternatives are being pursued and developments are being made which has given rise to the idea of quantum computing.

Quantum Computing vs Traditional Computing

Quantum computers in theory do things differently. Information is represented in physical states that are so small that they obey the laws of Quantum Mechanics. This information is stored in quantum bits known as qubits rather than the traditional binary bits used in conventional computers. Quantum Mechanics allows a qubit to store a probability of its value being either a 0 or 1 with with the exact value of the qubit unknown until it is measured. Without getting too technical, this allows a quantum computer to contain several states at the same time, giving it the potential to be millions of times faster at solving certain problems than classical computers. This staggering computational power in theory could be used to render modern cryptography obsolete.

Quantum Computing vs Cryptography

Quantum Computing Research

The Future & Quantum Computing

A full stack developer who has dabbled around with technologies.